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Voluntary Product Accessibility Template® (VPAT®)

Revised Section 508 Edition Version 2.3

Tested on Bitbucket Server and Data Center v5.15.0

December 2018


Table Information for VPAT® Readers

                       For each of the standards, the criteria are listed by chapter in a table.  The structures of the tables are: the first column contains the criteria being evaluated, the second column describes the level of conformance of the product regarding the criteria and the third column contains any additional remarks and explanations regarding the product.

  • When sections of criteria do not apply, or deemed by the customer as not applicable, the section is noted as such and the rest of that table may be removed for that section.
  • When multiple standards are being recorded in this document, the duplicative sections are noted and responded to only one time.  The duplicate entry will note the cross reference to the data.

Atlassian Pty Ltd Accessibility Conformance Report

Revised Section 508 Edition

VPAT® Version 2.3 – December 2018

Name of Product/Version: Bitbucket.

Product Description: 

Bitbucket is a Git repository management solution designed for professional teams. It gives you a central place to manage git repositories, collaborate on your source code and guide you through the development flow.

The scope of this VPAT is restricted to Specific pages listed in the table below. This includes 2 support documentation (Html format only) pages reviewed as sample.

The application was accessed using login credentials provided for the test environment.

Id#

Web Page / Screen / Document Identifier

Location / URL

1

Login

home url

2

Left Navigation1

/projects/TEST

3

Password reset

/passwordreset

4

projects

/projects

5

admin

/admin

6

users

/admin/users

7

Create a user

/admin/users?create

8

User profile

/admin/users/view?name=n5mashni

9

permissions

/admin/permissions

10

Create a project

/projects?create

11

Project page

/projects/TEST

12

Project settings

/projects/TEST/settings

13

Project permissions

/projects/TEST/permissions

14

Project lists

/projects

15

Create repo

/projects/TEST/repos?create

16

Repo page

/projects/TEST/repos/test1/browse

17

Repo settings

/projects/TEST/repos/test1/settings

18

Search results

/plugins/servlet/search?q=project%3ATEST%20repo%3Atest1%20test

19

Clone repo

/projects/TEST/repos/cute/browse

20

Fork repo

/projects/TEST/repos/cute?fork

21

Browse source

/projects/TEST/repos/cute/browse

22

Brose commits

/projects/TEST/repos/cute/commits

23

Browse branches

/projects/TEST/repos/cute/branches

24

Create branch

/plugins/servlet/create-branch?repoId=12&branchFrom=refs%2Fheads%2Fmaster

25

Create PR

/projects/TEST/repos/cute/pull-requests?create

26

View PR

/projects/TEST/repos/cute/pull-requests/1/overview

27

View profile

/profile

28

View Account Settings

/account

29

Browse, review, merge PR

/projects/TEST/repos/cute/pull-requests

30

Bitbucket Server Documentation Directory

https://confluence.atlassian.com/alldoc/bitbucket-server-documentation-directory-278071997.html

31

Bitbucket Data Center


https://confluence.atlassian.com/bitbucketserver0515/bitbucket-data-center-961276164.html

Date: 

March 27, 2019

Contact information: 

Peter Scobie

Atlassian

363 George St, Sydney NSW 2000

Evaluation Methods Used: 

*Automation used aXe core rule engine 3.2

*Manual assessment based on Windows 10 – Firefox 63.0 – NVDA 2018.3.2 

Applicable Standards/Guidelines

This report covers the degree of conformance for the following accessibility standard/guidelines:

Standard/Guideline

Included In Report

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, at http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/REC-WCAG20-20081211/

Level A (Yes)

Level AA (Yes)

Level AAA (No)

Revised Section 508 standards as published by the U.S. Access Board in the Federal Register on January 18, 2017

Corrections to the ICT Final Rule as published by the US Access Board in the Federal Register on January 22, 2018

(Yes)

Terms

The terms used in the Conformance Level information are defined as follows:

  • Supports: The functionality of the product has at least one method that meets the criterion without known defects or meets with equivalent facilitation.
  • Partially Supports: Some functionality of the product does not meet the criterion.
  • Does Not Support: The majority of product functionality does not meet the criterion.
  • Not Applicable: The criterion is not relevant to the product.
  • Not Evaluated: The product has not been evaluated against the criterion. This can be used only in WCAG 2.0 Level AAA.

WCAG 2.0 Report

Tables 1 and 2 also document conformance with: 

  • Chapter 5 – 501.1 Scope, 504.2 Content Creation or Editing
  • Chapter 6 – 602.3 Electronic Support Documentation

Note: When reporting on conformance with the WCAG 2.0 Success Criteria, they are scoped for full pages, complete processes, and accessibility-supported ways of using technology as documented in the WCAG 2.0 Conformance Requirements.

Table 1: Success Criteria, Level A

Notes:

Criteria

Conformance Level 

Remarks and Explanations

1.1.1 Non-text Content (Level A) All non-text content that is presented to the user has a text alternative that serves the equivalent purpose, except for the situations listed below.

Controls, Input

If non-text content is a control or accepts user input, then it has a name that describes its purpose. (Refer to Success Criterion 4.1.2 for additional requirements for controls and content that accepts user input.)

Time-Based Media

If non-text content is time-based media, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content. (Refer to Guideline 1.2 for additional requirements for media.)

Test

If non-text content is a test or exercise that would be invalid if presented in text, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content.

Sensory

If non-text content is primarily intended to create a specific sensory experience, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content.

CAPTCHA

If the purpose of non-text content is to confirm that content is being accessed by a person rather than a computer, then text alternatives that identify and describe the purpose of the non-text content are provided, and alternative forms of CAPTCHA using output modes for different types of sensory perception are provided to accommodate different disabilities.

Decoration, Formatting, Invisible

If non-text content is pure decoration, is used only for visual formatting, or is not presented to users, then it is implemented in a way that it can be ignored by assistive technology.

 Partially Supports 

 Exceptions:

  1. Some Informative/active  images are missing alternative text in Projects page.


  1. Some informative CSS images are missing alternate text in 10 pages.


  1. Long alternative text is missing for the architecture image in “Bit bucket data center” screen.

              Accessibility problem it causes:

People who are blind cannot see images on a page. In order to give access to the information conveyed by the image, it must have a text alternative. The text alternative must describe the information or function represented by the image. Screen readers can then use the alternative text to convey that information to the screen reader user.




1.2.1 Audio-only and Video-only (Prerecorded) (Level A) For prerecorded audio-only and prerecorded video-only media, the following are true, except when the audio or video is a media alternative for text and is clearly labeled as such:

Prerecorded Audio-only

An alternative for time-based media is provided that presents equivalent information for prerecorded audio-only content.

Prerecorded Video-only

Either an alternative for time-based media or an audio track is provided that presents equivalent information for prerecorded video-only content.


Supports

There is no time based media available in the current iteration of the product

1.2.2 Captions (Prerecorded) (Level A) Captions are provided for all prerecorded audio content in synchronized media, except when the media is a media alternative for text and is clearly labeled as such.

Supports

There is no time based media available in the current iteration of the product.

1.2.3 Audio Description or Media Alternative (Prerecorded) (Level A) An alternative for time-based media or audio description of the prerecorded video content is provided for synchronized media, except when the media is a media alternative for text and is clearly labeled as such.

Supports

There is no time based media available in the current iteration of the product.

1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A) Information, structure, and relationships conveyed through presentation can be programmatically determined or are available in text.

Partially Supports

Exceptions:

  1. aria-hidden="true" is used incorrectly in over 5 pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Using the aria-hidden="true" attribute on an element removes the element and ALL of its child nodes from the accessibility API making it completely inaccessible to screen readers and other assistive technologies.

  1. Data table is missing row header cell markup in Create a project-Project permissions screen.
  2. Incorrect table markup provided in Create a project-Project permissions screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

If data table is not marked up properly, screen reader users not able to understand the logical relationships of data arranged in a table, tables need HTML markup that indicates header cells and data cells and defines their relationship.



  1. Some Form elements are missing labels in over 10 pages.
  2. Some of the form controls are not correctly associated with its visible label either explicitly or implicitly in over 3 pages.


  1. Some Group of form controls are not associated with their respective group labels in over 2 screens.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Screen reader user cannot understand the relationship of labels and its form fields unless the label and form element must be programmatically associated. 

Screen reader users cannot use the visual layout of a group of related form elements and their shared group label, to understand the relationship of the form fields, their individual labels, and their group label, the relationships must be expressed semantically.

  1. Some Visual heading texts are not marked as a heading programmatically in 8 pages.
  2. Some visual list is not marked as a list programmatically in the Header screen.
  3. Content is not a list but is marked as such in Add user-create a project screen and Bitbucket data center screen.
  4. Some <li> elements not properly nested within <ul> or<ol> in the create PR and View PR screens.
  5. Nested list is not properly marked in “Bit bucket data center” screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

People who can see are able to quickly scan a page for headings, subheadings and Lists, nested lists to understand the content and structure of a page. People who are blind do not have this ability if heading texts and lists are not marked in a way that screen readers can understand. Heading text and hierarchy must be identified semantically with heading markup and Lists must be marked semantically in a way that correctly identifies the list structure and type. 


1.3.2 Meaningful Sequence (Level A) When the sequence in which content is presented affects its meaning, a correct reading sequence can be programmatically determined.

Partially Supports

Exceptions:

  1. Auto suggestion feature is not exposed to the screen readers in the create a project-project permissions screen.
  2. Info icon's on hover content is not exposed to the screen reader & keyboard only users in the create repo-Repo Page2.
  3. Reading order is not logical/intuitive in Header and Create a project-Project permissions and Bit bucket data center screen.
  4. Hidden content is exposed to screen reader in the View account settings screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Sometimes content must be read in a certain order to be understood. When screen reader users navigate page content, they hear the content in the order of the code in the DOM. If the order of the code and the visual order of content differ in such a way that meaning of content is changed, screen readers users may not understand the content correctly. The order of content in the DOM must be logical. The visual order of the content can differ from the source code order, as long as the reading order for screen readers is still logical and meaningful.

  1. Screen readers can read parent page content outside the modal using arrow keys in over 2 screens.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Modal dialogs overlay page content and prevent users from interacting with the content behind the modal dialog until it is dismissed. If screen reader users can read content behind a modal dialog window, they may become disoriented or confused. Both keyboard focus and screen reader focus must be trapped within a modal dialog until it is dismissed. 


1.3.3 Sensory Characteristics  (Level A) Instructions provided for understanding and operating content do not rely solely on sensory characteristics of components such as shape, color, size, visual location, orientation, or sound.

Supports.


1.4.1 Use of Color (Level A) Color is not used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, prompting a response, or distinguishing a visual element.

NOTE

This success criterion addresses color perception specifically. Other forms of perception are covered in Guideline 1.3 including programmatic access to color and other visual presentation coding.

Partially supports

Exceptions:

  1. Color is used to convey information that is not conveyed in any other way in the view Account settings screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

When color alone is used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, prompting a response, or distinguishing a visual element, people who are blind, have low vision, or are color blind will not be able to access that information

Example:

    1. Observed that gray color is used for "Account settings" link to convey the selected page inView account settings screen. 

Note: The link is displayed in the left navigation.


  1. Few Link texts lacks 3 to 1 contrast ratio with its surrounding texts in over 11 pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

When link text is visually differentiated from surrounding body text only by color, people who are color blind or with low vision may miss links. Link text must be differentiated from surrounding text either by: 1) an underline (or similar) in the default state, or 2) a contrast ratio of at least 3.0 to 1 between link text and surrounding text PLUS an underline (or similar) on mouse hover. When link text is adequately distinguished from surrounding text, people who have visual disabilities will be less likely to miss links.


1.4.2 Audio Control (Level A) If any audio on a Web page plays automatically for more than 3 seconds, either a mechanism is available to pause or stop the audio, or a mechanism is available to control audio volume independently from the overall system volume level.

NOTE

Since any content that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole page, all content on the Web page (whether or not it is used to meet other success criteria) must meet this success criterion. See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference.


Supports

There is no time based media available in the current iteration of the product.

2.1.1 Keyboard (Level A) Level A)

All functionality of the content is operable through a keyboard interface without requiring specific timings for individual keystrokes, except where the underlying function requires input that depends on the path of the user's movement and not just the endpoints.

NOTE

This exception relates to the underlying function, not the input technique. For example, if using handwriting to enter text, the input technique (handwriting) requires path-dependent input but the underlying function (text input) does not.

NOTE

This does not forbid and should not discourage providing mouse input or other input methods in addition to keyboard operation.


Partially Supports

Exceptions:

  1. Some elements are not accessible by keyboard alone in over 7 pages.
  2. Some element uses device-dependent event handlers and is therefore not accessible by keyboard alone in over 10 pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Some people cannot use a mouse due to vision or motor disabilities, which results to miss the functionality of an element.

 Content that can be operated with a mouse must also be made operable with keyboard. When content is operable through a keyboard, it becomes operable by a variety assistive technology such as speech input software, sip-and-puff software, on-screen keyboards, scanning software, and alternate keyboards.

Example:

    1. refer this issue for the close button(x) of "merge conflict" modal, which will appear upon activation of "more information" link.

Note: The same issue is applicable for the"merge" modal and "Edit", "decline","Delete" modals, which will appear upon activation of "..." button located next to the merge button in View PR screen.

    1. refer to this issue for the help "tooltip" modals, located inside the main content of Add user permissions screen.


2.1.2 No Keyboard Trap (Level A) If keyboard focus can be moved to a component of the page using a keyboard interface, then focus can be moved away from that component using only a keyboard interface, and, if it requires more than unmodified arrow or tab keys or other standard exit methods, the user is advised of the method for moving focus away.

NOTE

Since any content that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole page, all content on the Web page (whether it is used to meet other success criteria or not) must meet this success criterion. See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference.


Partially supports.

Exceptions:


There is a keyboard trap in the create Branch screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Sometimes custom widgets, plugins, embedded applications, and other content formats can create a keyboard "trap" where the keyboard focus gets stuck in one place or within a widget or application. Keyboard traps can make interacting with web content extremely difficult or impossible for keyboard users. 

Example:

Tab key navigation is not possible when the "Repository" combo box is expanded and the moves to the form field with placeholder value "Search for a Repository" in Create Branch screen.

2.2.1 Timing Adjustable (Level A) For each time limit that is set by the content, at least one of the following is true:

Turn off

The user is allowed to turn off the time limit before encountering it; or

Adjust

The user is allowed to adjust the time limit before encountering it over a wide range that is at least ten times the length of the default setting; or

Extend

The user is warned before time expires and given at least 20 seconds to extend the time limit with a simple action (for example, "press the space bar"), and the user is allowed to extend the time limit at least ten times; or

Real-time Exception

The time limit is a required part of a real-time event (for example, an auction), and no alternative to the time limit is possible; or

Essential Exception

The time limit is essential and extending it would invalidate the activity; or

20 Hour Exception

The time limit is longer than 20 hours.

NOTE

This success criterion helps ensure that users can complete tasks without unexpected changes in content or context that are a result of a time limit. This success criterion should be considered in conjunction with Success Criterion 3.2.1, which puts limits on changes of content or context as a result of user action.

Partially Supports

Exceptions:


The form successful updates information is not announced to any users, there is no mechanism to adjust the time limit of this success messages, and it disappears without giving any user a chance to read it in over 2 screens.

Accessibility problem it causes:

People with disabilities such as blindness, low vision, mobility impairments, and cognitive limitations may require more time to read content or to perform functions such as filling out online forms. If a session has a time limit, it may be difficult or impossible for some users to perform the required action before a time limit occurs.



2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide (Level A) For moving, blinking, scrolling, or auto-updating information, all of the following are true:

Moving, blinking, scrolling

For any moving, blinking or scrolling information that (1) starts automatically, (2) lasts more than five seconds, and (3) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it unless the movement, blinking, or scrolling is part of an activity where it is essential; and

Auto-updating

For any auto-updating information that (1) starts automatically and (2) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it or to control the frequency of the update unless the auto-updating is part of an activity where it is essential.

NOTE

For requirements related to flickering or flashing content, refer to Guideline 2.3.

NOTE

Since any content that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole page, all content on the Web page (whether it is used to meet other success criteria or not) must meet this success criterion. See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference.

NOTE

Content that is updated periodically by software or that is streamed to the user agent is not required to preserve or present information that is generated or received between the initiation of the pause and resuming presentation, as this may not be technically possible, and in many situations could be misleading to do so.

NOTE

An animation that occurs as part of a preload phase or similar situation can be considered essential if interaction cannot occur during that phase for all users and if not indicating progress could confuse users or cause them to think that content was frozen or broken.

Supports

There is no moving, blinking, scrolling, or auto-updating information is available in the current iteration of the product.

2.3.1 Three Flashes or Below Threshold (Level A) 

Web pages do not contain anything that flashes more than three times in any one second period, or the flash is below the general flash and red flash thresholds.

NOTE

Since any content that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole page, all content on the Web page (whether it is used to meet other success criteria or not) must meet this success criterion. See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference.


Supports

Atlassian does not contain a part that flashes more than three times in one second.

2.4.1 Bypass Blocks (Level A) A mechanism is available to bypass blocks of content that are repeated on multiple Web pages.

Partially Supports

Exceptions:

The skip link does not become visible when it receives focus in all pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

In contrast to a sighted person's ability to visually skip past repeated content at the top of a page - such as heading graphics and navigation links - people who are blind must read content sequentially with a screen reader, starting at the top of the page. Similarly, mouse users can click directly on an element in the middle of a page, while keyboard users must tab past all links, buttons, form fields, etc. to get to an element further into a page. To help screen reader and keyboard users bypass content repeated across multiple pages, a mechanism is required - such as a skip link, good heading structure, HTML5 sectioning elements, or ARIA landmarks.

2.4.2 Page Titled (Level A) Web pages have titles that describe topic or purpose.

Partially Supports

Exceptions:

Page TITLE does not identify purpose of page in over 2 pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

In contrast to a sighted person's ability to visually skip past repeated content at the top of a page - such as heading graphics and navigation links - people who are blind must read content sequentially with a screen reader, starting at the top of the page. Similarly, mouse users can click directly on an element in the middle of a page, while keyboard users must tab past all links, buttons, form fields, etc. to get to an element further into a page. To help screen reader and keyboard users bypass content repeated across multiple pages, a mechanism is required - such as a skip link, good heading structure, HTML5 sectioning elements, or ARIA landmarks.

2.4.3 Focus Order (Level A) If a Web page can be navigated sequentially and the navigation sequences affect meaning or operation, focusable components receive focus in an order that preserves meaning and operability.

Partially Supports

Exceptions:

  1. Auto suggestion results of the add users edit field is not next in navigation order in create a project-project permissions screen.
  2. Focus order is not logical in the View account settings screen.
  3. The tab order is not logical in over 5 screens.
  4. Tabindex="-1" is used on actionable elements making it inaccessible to assistive technology and keyboard only users in over 6 screens.

Accessibility problem it causes:

When keyboard focusable components do not receive focus in a logical order, or results to an empty tab stop people with mobility impairments, reading disabilities, and low vision are all impacted. The keyboard focus order must be logical and consistent with the layout of the content. A logical focus order makes interaction with content predictable for people who rely on a keyboard to interact with web content.


  1. Focus is not maintained within the modal. It is possible to tab out of the modal in 6 screens.
  2. When the modal is activated, focus is not placed on the modal in the Browse source screen.
  3. When the modal is closed, focus is not returned to the triggering element in 2 screens.
  4. Opened Submenu is not the next thing in the sequential navigation order after the control that triggered the menu in the Create repo-Clone repo screen and create a project-project permissions screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Modal dialogs overlay page content and prevent users from interacting with the content behind the modal dialog until it is dismissed. If sighted keyboard users or screen reader users can tab to content behind a modal dialog window, they may become disoriented or confused. Both keyboard focus and screen reader focus must be trapped within a modal dialog until it is dismissed. When both keyboard focus and browsing are trapped within a modal dialog, screen reader users are able to interact with it as intended.

  1. Item in focus is visibly hidden but still keyboard accessible in 5 screens.

Accessibility problem it causes:

When an element that is not visible receives keyboard focus, sighted keyboard users and screen reader users may be left wondering if they are missing content or functionality. Every focusable element must have content and be visible. Then sighted keyboard users and screen reader users will know where their focus is and can be certain they are not missing content or functionality.


2.4.4 Link Purpose (In Context) (Level A) The purpose of each link can be determined from the link text alone or from the link text together with its programmatically determined link context, except where the purpose of the link would be ambiguous to users in general.

Supports

Purposes of the links are clear within its context in Atlassian pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

When link text - along with its immediately surrounding content - does not completely describe the destination of a link, people who are blind, and people with mobility impairments, reading disabilities, and low vision may have more difficulty understanding the purpose of a link so they can decide whether they want to follow the link. In order to sufficiently describe a link's destination, the link text and its immediately surrounding content must provide a complete description of the destination.

3.1.1 Language of Page (Level A) The default human language of each Web page can be programmatically determined.

Supports


3.2.1 On Focus (Level A) When any user interface component receives focus, it does not initiate a change of context.

Supports.


3.2.2 On Input (Level A) Changing the setting of any user interface component does not automatically cause a change of context unless the user has been advised of the behavior before using the component.

Supports.


3.3.1 Error Identification (Level A) If an input error is automatically detected, the item that is in error is identified and the error is described to the user in text.

Supports.


3.3.2 Labels or Instructions (Level A) Labels or instructions are provided when content requires user input.

Partially Supports

Exceptions: 

  1. No visual label is present and the purpose of these fields is not clear without a visual label in 8 pages.
  2. Additional instructions are only provided for the control to people who do not have disabilities. For a person with disabilities, the instructions are incomplete in 3 pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Filling out forms correctly can be one of the more time consuming and frustrating online user experiences, and it can be even more challenging for people with disabilities. The single easiest way to prevent user errors is by providing clear and persistent labels and instructions that are available to everyone at all times. Labels and instructions should: 

  1. be clear and informative, 
  2. Group of form controls should be grouped together with associated group level label.

3) disclose any constraints such as required data formats or ranges, and 

4) Identify required fields. Well-designed labels and instructions provide enough information so people can fill out forms without undue confusion or errors.



4.1.1 Parsing (Level A) In content implemented using markup languages, elements have complete start and end tags, elements are nested according to their specifications, elements do not contain duplicate attributes, and any IDs are unique, except where the specifications allow these features.

NOTE

Start and end tags that are missing a critical character in their formation, such as a closing angle bracket or a mismatched attribute value quotation mark are not complete.

Partially Supports

Exceptions:

  1. Some elements are missing either closing tag or opening tag in 4 pages
  2. Elements must only use allowed ARIA attributes in 3 pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Invalid code - such as incorrectly nested elements and incorrect usage of ARIA - doesn't always cause accessibility problems, but it can, especially if there are errors in the parts of the markup that screen readers rely on to communicate the semantics of the web page to users. Incorrectly nested elements - have the potential to cause serious or critical issues for screen reader users.


  1. The page contains duplicate id values. This adversely impacts behavior of assistive technologies on different platforms and sometimes the content's functionality tool in 3 pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Invalid code - such as duplicate IDs on a page - doesn't always cause accessibility problems, but it can, especially if there are errors in the parts of the markup that screen readers rely on to communicate the semantics of the web page to users. Duplicate ID values have the potential to cause serious or critical issues for screen reader users with form labels, custom widget labels, error message / form field associations, table header associations, and any aria- attributes (such as aria-labelledby and aria-describedby) that reference ID values.



4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A) For all user interface components (including but not limited to: form elements, links and components generated by scripts), the name and role can be programmatically determined; states, properties, and values that can be set by the user can be programmatically set; and notification of changes to these items is available to user agents, including assistive technologies.

NOTE

This success criterion is primarily for Web authors who develop or script their own user interface components. For example, standard HTML controls already meet this success criterion when used according to specification.


Partially supports.

Exceptions:

  1. Some elements appears and functions like a button but is not marked up as such in over 6 pages.
  2. Accessible name for combo box options is not exposed to the screen reader in the View account settings screen.
  3. The button does not have a proper accessible name. As a result, its purpose/function is not clearly exposed to assistive technology users in over 4 pages.
  4. Element appears like a combobox but not coded so in the view account settings screen.
  5. The expanded/collapsed state is not exposed to assistive technology in over 18 pages.
  6. Element is missing role in Create a project-project permissions screen.
  7. Link missing discernible text in over 7 screens.
  8. Menu and menu items are incompletely exposed VIA ARIA making inaccessible to be screen reader as well as keyboard only users in over 2 pages.
  9. Presence of submenu is not exposed in Bit bucket data center screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Every user interface control must have a role along with any applicable states and properties so that screen reader users know how to interact with the control. Native HTML elements - such as <button>, <a>, <input>, <select> - already have a role, and their necessary states and properties - such as the checked/unchecked state of a checkbox - are automatically conveyed so nothing more needs to be done. If you create a custom version of a native HTML element or a custom control or widget that does not have a native HTML equivalent, you must add the relevant role(s) and any applicable states and properties using ARIA as well as expected keyboard interactions.


  1. The link does not have an href value defined in the View PR screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Links made from <a> elements must have a href attribute to be valid hyperlinks. Without a href attribute, screen readers will not know that the text within the <a> element is a hyperlink and it will not be keyboard focusable.












Table 2: Success Criteria, Level AA

Notes:

Criteria

Conformance Level 

Remarks and Explanations

1.2.4 Captions (Live) (Level AA) Captions are provided for all live audio content in synchronized media.

Supports

There is no time based media available in the current iteration of the product.

1.2.5 Audio Description (Prerecorded) (Level AA) Audio description is provided for all prerecorded video content in synchronized media.

Supports

There is no time based media available in the current iteration of the product.

1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum) (Level AA) The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following:

Large Text

Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1;

Incidental

Text or images of text that are part of an inactive user interface component, that are pure decoration, that are not visible to anyone, or that are part of a picture that contains significant other visual content, have no contrast requirement.

Logotypes

Text that is part of a logo or brand name has no contrast requirement.


Partially supports

Exceptions:


  1. Few Link texts and regular texts lacks 4.5 to 1 contrast ratio with their background colors in over 24 pages.
  2. The color contrast ratio between the link text and its background is not at least 4.5 to 1 on hover and/or on focus in over 12 screens.

Accessibility problem it causes:

People who have low vision or are colorblind may have difficulty reading text if the contrast between the text its background is insufficient. When the contrast ratio between text and its background is adequate, people who have low vision or are colorblind are more likely to be able to read the text.


1.4.4 Resize text (Level AA) Except for captions and images of text, text can be resized without assistive technology up to 200 percent without loss of content or functionality.

Partially supports

Exceptions:

Text content is lost at 200% zoom in the Add users-users screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

People who have low vision may not be able to read text at its default size. Browsers allow people to zoom the page, but sometimes the text is cut off or functionality is obscured as the page is zoomed. Content must be flexible enough to be scaled to 200% by the browser without having text cut off or functionality lost. When text is able to be scaled up to 200% by the browser, more people with mild visual disabilities will be able to read it without requiring the use of assistive technology such as a screen magnifier.

1.4.5 Images of Text (Level AA) If the technologies being used can achieve the visual presentation, text is used to convey information rather than images of text except for the following:

Customizable

The image of text can be visually customized to the user's requirements;

Essential

A particular presentation of text is essential to the information being conveyed.

NOTE

Logotypes (text that is part of a logo or brand name) are considered essential.


Supports.

Architecture image uses an images of text instead of real text in Bitbucket data center screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

When an image of text is used instead of real text styled with CSS, people with low vision and other visual disabilities are not able to modify or zoom the text to meet their needs. In order to be modifiable by users, text content has to be real text instead of embedded in an image. This allows people with low vision and other visual disabilities to zoom or modify the visual presentation of text to meet their needs using browser zoom, a custom CSS stylesheet, high contrast mode, browser plugins, or other assistive technologies.

2.4.5 Multiple Ways (Level AA) More than one way is available to locate a Web page within a set of Web pages except where the Web Page is the result of, or a step in, a process.

Supports.


2.4.6 Headings and Labels (Level AA) Headings and labels describe topic or purpose.

Supports.


2.4.7 Focus Visible (Level AA) Any keyboard operable user interface has a mode of operation where the keyboard focus indicator is visible.

Partially supports.

Exceptions:

The focus indicator (e.g. border or dotted underline / background etc.) is not clearly visible as one tabs through the page in over 8 pages.

Accessibility problem it causes:

When a visible keyboard focus indicator is not provided, sighted keyboard users will have no idea which link or control has focus making it extremely difficult, if not impossible, to interact with the content.


3.1.2 Language of Parts (Level AA) The human language of each passage or phrase in the content can be programmatically determined except for proper names, technical terms, words of indeterminate language, and words or phrases that have become part of the vernacular of the immediately surrounding text.

Partially supports

Exceptions:

The change in language is not marked in the view account settings screen.

Accessibility problem it causes:

Most screen readers can read several different languages. When content is written in more than one language, a screen reader does not know to switch languages unless the markup tells it to.


3.2.3 Consistent Navigation (Level AA) Navigational mechanisms that are repeated on multiple Web pages within a set of Web pages occur in the same relative order each time they are repeated, unless a change is initiated by the user.

Supports.


3.2.4 Consistent Identification (Level AA) Components that have the same functionality within a set of Web pages are identified consistently.

Supports.


3.3.3 Error Suggestion (Level AA) If an input error is automatically detected and suggestions for correction are known, then the suggestions are provided to the user, unless it would jeopardize the security or purpose of the content.

Supports.


3.3.4 Error Prevention (Legal, Financial, Data) (Level AA) For Web pages that cause legal commitments or financial transactions for the user to occur, that modify or delete user-controllable data in data storage systems, or that submit user test responses, at least one of the following is true:

Reversible

Submissions are reversible.

Checked

Data entered by the user is checked for input errors and the user is provided an opportunity to correct them.

Confirmed

A mechanism is available for reviewing, confirming, and correcting information before finalizing the submission.


Supports.


Revised Section 508 Report

Chapter 3: Functional Performance Criteria (FPC)

Note: Not applicable (Reference: E204.1 and E205.4 of Appendix A to Part 1194 – Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act:
Application and Scoping Requirements.

Criteria

Conformance Level 

Remarks and Explanations

302.1 Without Vision:

Where a visual mode of operation is provided, ICT shall provide at least one mode of operation that does not require user vision.



302.2 With Limited Vision:

Where a visual mode of operation is provided, ICT shall provide at least one mode of operation that enables users to make use of limited vision.



302.3 Without Perception of Color:

Where a visual mode of operation is provided, ICT shall provide at least one visual mode of operation that does not require user perception of color.



302.4 Without Hearing:

Where an audible mode of operation is provided, ICT shall provide at least one mode of operation that does not require user hearing.



302.5 With Limited Hearing:

Where an audible mode of operation is provided, ICT shall provide at least one mode of operation that enables users to make use of limited hearing.



302.6 Without Speech:

Where speech is used for input, control, or operation, ICT shall provide at least one mode of operation that does not require user speech.



302.7 With Limited Manipulation:

Where a manual mode of operation is provided, ICT shall provide at least one mode of operation that does not require fine motor control or simultaneous manual operations.



302.8 With Limited Reach and Strength:

Where a manual mode of operation is provided, ICT shall provide at least one mode of operation that is operable with limited reach and limited strength.



302.9 With Limited Language, Cognitive, and Learning Abilities:

ICT shall provide features making its use by individuals with limited cognitive, language, and learning abilities simpler and easier.



Chapter 4: Hardware

Notes: The ICT covered by this VPAT is not hardware. As such, the requirements of this chapter do not apply. 

Chapter 5: Software

Notes: The requirements of this chapter do not apply for the web application that was evaluated.

Chapter 6: Support Documentation and Services

Notes:

Criteria

Conformance Level 

Remarks and Explanations

601.1 Scope:

The technical requirements in Chapter 6 shall apply to ICT support documentation and services where required by 508 Chapter 2 (Scoping Requirements), 255 Chapter 2 (Scoping Requirements), and where otherwise referenced in any other chapter of the Revised 508 Standards or Revised 255 Guidelines.

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Heading cell – no response required

602 Support Documentation

Heading cell – no response required

Heading cell – no response required

602.2 Accessibility and Compatibility Features:

Documentation shall list and explain how to use the accessibility and compatibility features required by Chapters 4 and 5. Documentation shall include accessibility features that are built-in and accessibility features that provide compatibility with assistive technology.

Not applicable.

Requirement#502 of Chapter5 applies mainly to software and not to Web applications.

602.3 Electronic Support Documentation:

Documentation in electronic format, including Web-based self-service support, shall conform to Level A and Level AA Success Criteria and Conformance Requirements in WCAG 2.0.

See WCAG 2.0 section

See information in WCAG section

602.4 Alternate Formats for Non-Electronic Support Documentation:

Where support documentation is only provided in non-electronic formats, alternate formats usable by individuals with disabilities shall be provided upon request.

Not applicable.

Support documentation is provided electronically.

603 Support Services

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603.2 Information on Accessibility and Compatibility Features:

ICT support services shall include information on the accessibility and compatibility features required by 602.2.

Not applicable.

Requirement#502 of Chapter5 applies mainly to software and not to a Web application. Besides, ICT support services were not evaluated as part of this scope.

603.3 Accommodation of Communication Needs:

Support services shall be provided directly to the user or through a referral to a point of contact. Such ICT support services shall accommodate the communication needs of individuals with disabilities.

Not supported.

Product support available to paying customer was not evaluated as part of this scope.

Pages / Documents That Do Not Support One or More Success Criteria   

  1. Create Branch 
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