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Summary

  • We encourage and display customer comments and votes openly in our issue tracking system, http://jira.atlassian.com.
  • We do not publish roadmaps.
  • Product Managers review our most popular voted issues on a regular basis.
  • We schedule features based on a variety of factors.
  • Our Atlassian Bug Fixing Policy is distinct from our Feature Request process.
  • Atlassian provides consistent updates on the top 20 feature/improvement requests (in our issue tracker systems).

How to Track what Features are Being Implemented

When a new feature or improvement is scheduled, the 'fix-for' version will be indicated in the JIRA issue. This happens for the upcoming release only. We maintain roadmaps for more distant releases internally, but because these roadmaps are often pre-empted by changing customer demands, we do not publish them. 

How Atlassian Chooses What to Implement

In every major release we aim to implement highly requested features, but it is not the only determining factor. Other factors include:

  • Customer contact: We get the chance to meet customers and hear their successes and challenges at Atlassian Summit, Atlassian Unite, developer conferences, and road shows.
  • Customer interviews: All product managers at Atlassian do customer interviews.  Our interviews are not simply to capture a list of features, but to understand our customers' goals and plans.
  • Community forums: There are large volumes of posts on answers, of votes and comments on jira.atlassian.com, and of conversations on community forums like groups on LinkedIn.
  • Customer Support: Our support team provides clear insights into the issues that are challenging for customers, and which are generating the most calls to support
  • Atlassian Experts: Our Experts provide insights into real-world customer deployments, especially for customers at scale.
  • Evaluator Feedback: When someone new tries our products, we want to know what they liked and disliked and often reach out to them for more detail.
  • In product feedback: The JIRA Issue Collectors that we embed our products for evaluators and our Early Access Program give us a constant pulse on how users are experiencing our product.
  • Usage data: Are customers using the features we have developed?
  • Product strategy: Our long-term strategic vision for the product.

 

How to Contribute to Feature Development

Influencing Atlassian's release cycle
We encourage our customers to vote on feature requests in JIRA. The current tally of votes is available online in our issue tracking system, http://jira.atlassian.com. Find out if your improvement request already exists. If it does, please vote for it. If you do not find it, create a new feature or improvement request online.

Extending Atlassian Products
Atlassian products have powerful and flexible extension APIs. If you would like to see a particular feature implemented, it may be possible to develop the feature as a plugin. Documentation regarding the plugin APIs is available. Advice on extending either product may be available on the user mailing-lists, or at Atlassian Answers.

If you require significant customisations, you may wish to get in touch with our partners. They specialise in extending Atlassian products and can do this work for you. If you are interested, please contact us.

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13 Comments

  1. I think another thing to mention in the "influencing Atlassian's Release Cycle" was touched on above it but is worth mentioning again. That is commenting on design ideas for a potential solution.

    I know as a software developer that having others put in some design work for you makes the solution easier to implement and better when the comments lead to a healthy discussion among customers of the best way to design a solution rather than the old "I want this really bad, but I'm not sure what the solution would look like." (smile)


    Again, I know you touched on that in the "well-defined" feature request, but I think it may be worth another mention in the Influencing section.

    Your company does an amazing job with communicating with your customers, and your products facilitate that. Thanks again!

  2. I agree that Atlassian's support is very good. However, the emphasis on voting is fatally flawed and really shouldnt be used as a barometer for customer requests. It skews strongly away from the silent majority (end users in enterprise) towards the vocal minority (small developer shops). This means the squeeky wheel eventually gets the oil, but one vote does not equal one end-user, given most end-users do not interact with Atlassian at all. At the very least, the voting should reflect the license of the voter. Votes from a 2000 user license should be worth considerably more than votes from a 10 user license, but this is not the case with the current system. 

  3. I agree with you sean diggins. During my evaluation of JIRA for users in an enterprise environment, I am finding a lot of features and functionality, that I assumed would be basic, left in an unassigned and unresolved state that has been open for 5+ years. It is a little concerning to think that a request for an important feature such as importing and exporting configuration data like workflows can be overlooked by a request to mention other users in comments simply because it had more votes and therefore deemed more wanted by the community.

    I love the tools and the support. I just find myself being constantly disappointed in what the tool cannot do in regards to supporting an enterprise.

  4. I agree with sean diggins and MarkW. It seems to be impossible to get features fixed or added. Wonder how 'big' the company need to be to get things fixed ....

  5. I also have to agree with the last three comments. We currently run a unlimited user license large JIRA installation in an enterprise environment. The idea that I have time to read through all of the feature requests, comments, documentation on the up and coming releases and vote is nuts! I am sorry Atlassian, my world does not revolve around you and your products. I am trying to run a business here. The only question left, will I continue to run it using Atlassian products? 

  6. I also agree 100%. Most of the users at our company will never come and vote on features in Atlassian's JIRA issue tracker for the Atlassian products we use. We have been long time users of these systems and the lack of certain features is extremely frustrating on a regular basis. We have an unlimited user license for Confluence, several thousand user license for JIRA, unlimited user license for Crowd, and are in the process of purchasing a 500 seat license for Stash. I would hope that since we pay Atlassian a lot of money both up front and then in ongoing maintenance our voices would be heard and counted more equitably but they aren't. Unfortunately now I as a developer for our company feel a need to go through the Atlassian JIRA issues and up vote on issues I deem important because of this flawed way of gauging interest in a feature enhancement to the products I use every day.

    I also consider Atlassian's lack of visibility into their road map to be seriously flawed. As a developer I understand not wanting to tie yourself down to commitments which are later found to be unattainable in the originally communicated time frame. It is perfectly understandable to me to see a feature that was originally scheduled for inclusion in version x.y of a product to move to a later version. I sometimes have to do that myself. What is terribly frustrating to me is not knowing that something is likely ever to get addressed, or at least not within several versions. Besides, publishing a road map would allow insight into what is being deemed important. Or are you afraid that people will notice that it isn't just highly voted items that are getting implemented?

    People who consume the products I develop don't appreciate it when I cannot tell them when a feature enhancement will be provided any more than I do. A big difference though is that I actually do provide them a road map detailing what features will be included in at least my next two versions. Sometimes these road maps change due to shifting priorities or business needs but it is a model that works well.

     

    1. JaromRon WinacottBjørn-Willy ArntzenMarkWsean diggins

      Thank you for your feedback and comments about our voting process.  The public voting on JIRA needs work/improvement, it is just one input we use to form the roadmap.  We recognize the needs of multiple types of customers that we serve - both large enterprises and small teams, and distribute feature investments to balance the needs of our customers.

      We are focusing more on our enterprise customers and their needs;  to hear about our JIRA enterprise roadmap and how we're focusing more on that - check out the JIRA State of the Union presentation from our Summit 2012 conference.

      We're also working on Confluence enterprise features as well, and are happy to talk to you directly about your feedback and needs.

      I ask that you join our user task force here.  And if you are interested in an immediate customer interview, please state that in the comments when signing up for the user task force.  We provide more roadmap information and invitations to beta and prototype programs to gather feedback from customers early.

      Cheers,

      Audra Eng 
      VP, Product Management 

       

  7. Hi,

    My request is to open .arf file directly from confluence page.

  8. Even though I agree that the vote system has its drawbacks, I think it's sad that it gives a false hope. Just comparing the issues planned for the upcoming versions of JIRA and seeing that of the 38 included issues the issue with most votes has 11 votes, while if checking for all unplanned issues I find 720 issues with more than 11 votes...

    https://jira.atlassian.com/issues/?jql=project%20%3D%20JRA%20AND%20fixVersion%20in%20%28%226.0-OD-07.1%22%2C%20%226.0-OD-08%22%2C%20%226.0-OD-09%22%29%20ORDER%20BY%20votes%20DESC%2C%20fixVersion%20ASC%2C%20created%20DESC (planned for the upcoming versions, with up to 11 votes)

    https://jira.atlassian.com/issues/?jql=project%20%3D%20JRA%20AND%20fixVersion%20in%20%28EMPTY%2C%20unreleasedVersions%28%29%2C%20%226.0-OD-07.1%22%2C%20%226.0-OD-08%22%2C%20%226.0-OD-09%22%29%20AND%20votes%20%3E%2011%20%20ORDER%20BY%20votes%20DESC%2C%20fixVersion%20ASC%2C%20created%20DESC (all issues not planned for a version that has more than 11 votes)

    Just remove the vote system if you don't use it more.

  9.  Bravo Nicklas, I completely agree. Thank you for the filters to prove the point.I see little to no influence on the product road map by paying customers. Atlassian just does what they want, or at least does not let us in on their "big picture" goals.

     

  10. Hi Nicklas Kittelmann and Ron Winacott,

    Thanks for your additional comments.  We do use the voting system, though it's not obvious to outsiders.  We pay attention to the comments made and the votes combined.  We make an effort to update the top 25 most voted issues on our plans to address them in the near term or long term; but I agree overall and acknowledge your frustration and comments regarding our lack of response to those issues.  We are looking at revamping the voting system and we need to respond to all customers voting on an issue - as there is an expectation that if a customer took the time to vote or comment on something - they want to be sure it's not going into a void and their efforts were not in vain.  

    The primary times we update our longer term roadmaps are during Summit and 1:1 conversations with customers.  We are investing in enterprise Product Managers who will reach out to enterprise customers directly.  It is still very useful to us, as we use it to detail our user stories and plan our backlogs when we decide to work on those features.  

    Please let me know if you're interested in a direct customer interview soon, and we'll follow up with you directly.  

    1. Nicklas, Ron,

      I work with Audra on the JIRA Product Management team and will also pass on my thanks for your frank and helpful feedback.

      The way the JIRA team uses our public issue tracker comes up quite a bit, so much so that Bryan Rollins the JIRA Group Product Manager wrote up a detailed post which you might like to read here: https://answers.atlassian.com/questions/110373/how-does-the-jira-team-use-jira-atlassian-com

      I should also mention that in JIRA 6.0 we are implementing a highly requested feature:  JRA-1549 - Ability to rename a user Resolved  which alone has 750 votes. You can read about this feature and many others in our EAP release notes. We generally do not mark the fix version for each feature until all coding is complete, the reason being is that there is always a chance it might slip and we would not want to disappoint customers by changing around the fix versions. However your overall point of not being able to see the roadmap is a valid one and hopefully after reading Bryan's post you will have a better understanding of our process.

       

      Cheers,

      Roy Krishna
      JIRA Product Management 

    2. It would be nice to participate in a customer interview. Hopefully I can give some good input.