Documentation for Confluence 5.4.
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An orphaned page is a page without any incoming links. This means that, unless you know that the page exists, you are not likely to come across it in the space during the natural course of navigation.

When you are working in a large space with a number of pages, it is difficult to keep track of all of them. An orphaned page may be redundant or may need to be referred to from another page. Confluence allows you to view all the orphaned pages in a space so you can tidy up the space by either deleting pages or reorganising them.

To view the orphaned pages in a space:

  1. Go to the space and choose Space tools > Content Tools on the sidebar. 
  2. Choose Orphaned Pages.

If your space uses the Documentation theme:

  1. Choose Browse > Space Operations at the top of the screen.
  2. Choose Orphaned Pages in the space operations options.

You can do the following:

  • Delete an orphaned page by choosing the 'trash can' icon next to the page name.
  • Edit a page by choosing the 'pencil' icon next to the page name.
  • Give an orphaned page a parent — see Moving a Page.

Screenshot: Managing orphaned pages


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15 Comments

  1. you say " you can "tidy up" the space by either deleting pages or by reorganizing them."  Bu I am not seeing the reorganizing them part.  Can you be more specific?

    Thanks.

  2. Lois is right. There is an important piece of information missing here. The answer lies elsewhere in this knowledge base, under the heading  MOVING A PAGE

  3. thank you for the feedback -- this page has been updated.

  4. Shouldn't child pages without any incomming links be found by this feature as well.  People rarely find child pages and its neccisary to find pages without actual links on other pages pointing to them even if they do have a parrent.  Is there a way to find these pages?

    1. If you ask me, the wrong question is asked here... as you pointed out, too.

      The problem is not with the pages not linked from anywhere. The problem is with the pages not visited by anyone, for whatever reason. If the content is irrelevant, then it can be linked by any number of incoming links, it is still just noise.

      The Archiving Plugin helps you by:

      More about the Archiving Plugin »

  5. Confluence is new to me, so excuse me if my question seems stupid.  So what's the consequence of having orphaned wiki pages?  Is it a bad thing?  Seems as if most users find their content through search anyway.

    1. Hi Barney,

      In my opinion, the reason to include a way to find out the orphaned page would be to structure all your documentation so that they are manageable. Sometimes, due to large number of pages, it is difficult to keep track of all of them.

      There could be other reasons as well that require a way to find out all orphaned pages. For example, the site author might have structured their pages so that they inherit all the permissions from the parent page. If there is an orphaned page, it would not inherit this permission and thus would be exposed to the public when it should not. That is the reason why there is a checking function in Confluence that allows you to easily find out all the orphaned pages.

      Hope this cleared your doubts.

      Cheers
      JSashi

  6. MG

    Is there a way to locate orphaned attachments (photos in particular).

    Similarly I was looking at {gallery} for a work around but couldn't find a way to include all the photos in an entire space. Suggestions?

    1. Hi MG,

      I am afraid that this is not currently possible. However, I have found a similar feature request. Please add yourself as a watcher, vote for this feature and add your own comments to this feature request. For further details on how we include new features and improvements, you might want to read this page

      Hope that helps.

      Cheers
      JSashi

  7. Trying to move pages from the root of one space to the root of another is problematic, and we ended up with one space having its home page orphaned.  There seems to be no way to fix this space now.  Three is no where you can move an orphaned home page to - if you select the space and home page, it doesnt help. If we try and browse the space, we get:

     

    The root page @home could not be found in space IT Public.

    1. Anonymous

      I had the same problem.  The fix for me was to set the "Home Page" in the "Space Details" section of the Space Admin

  8. Cant delete an orphaned page and while deleting I get error below error : please let me know how to manage? 

    The following error(s) occurred:

    • A title must be specified. Please enter a title for this page.
    • The page specified does not exist.

    Note: I also found a link on how to manage these draft pages: 

    Removing Orphaned Draft

    Let me know if the above is the solution/workaround?

     

  9. Anonymous

    Hi,

    We are using confluence 4.0 One of our users accidentally moved some pages when he saw the tree view. He say he didn't realize he can easily move the page on this view. Basically he has bunch of child pages (4-5) and he doesn't remember their parent page/s. So, the question is where we can track the moving history of a page or not?

  10. Anonymous

    Hi,

    I organized my documentation into chapter. I purposely did not attached it to the home page so when I do an export I have correct numerotation of chapteur and not a sole root chapter begining by 1 and othe others are sub chapter. How do we organize the chapters like a standard book or document?

  11. Just because there are no incoming links to that, an orphaned page should not be deleted. That's a risky practice, unless, of course, you are totally sure that it is really garbage.

    You should rather archive that by adding the "archive" label, and have the Archiving Plugin move it to a hidden archive space, from which it can be restored if you figure out that the content is actually valuable again.