Documentation for JIRA 4.4. Documentation for other versions of JIRA is available too.

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When migrating from other issue trackers, you may wish to take your data with you. Depending on what issue tracker you are migrating from, you are recommended to use one of the methods listed below to import data into JIRA.

1. Built-in importers

JIRA ships with the JIRA Importers Plugin pre-installed, so that you can easily import your bugs from Bugzilla, FogBugz, Mantis, Pivotal Tracker, or Trac.

  • Bugzilla Version 2.0 or later of the JIRA Importers Plugin is compatible with Bugzilla 2.20 to 3.6.4. Users of older Bugzilla versions will need to first upgrade the Bugzilla database tables to a supported version, using Bugzilla's checksetup.pl script. The JIRA Importers Plugin requires your Bugzilla database to be MySQL or PostgreSQL.
  • FogBugz Server (behind your firewall) Version 2.0 or later of the JIRA Importers Plugin is compatible with Fogbugz versions 7.3.6 to 8.2.27. The JIRA Importers Plugin requires your FogBugz database to be MySQL or MS SQL or MS SQL Express.
  • FogBugz OnDemand (Hosted) Version 3.1 or later of the JIRA Importers Plugin is required.
  • Mantis Version 2.0 or later of the JIRA Importers Plugin is compatible with Mantis versions 1.1.8 to 1.2.4. The JIRA Importers Plugin requires your Mantis database to be MySQL or PostgreSQL. (The JIRA Importers Plugin has also been reported to work with MS SQL, Oracle and DB2, but it has not been tested against these databases.)
  • Pivotal Tracker Version 2.5 or later of the JIRA Importers Plugin is required.
  • Trac Version 2.6.1 or later of the JIRA Importers Plugin is compatible with Trac version 0.12.2.

On this page:

(warning) The information on this page does not apply to JIRA OnDemand.

2. CSV Importer

If you are migrating from a system for which JIRA does not provide a built-in importer, you may be able to import your data into JIRA via CSV format instead. Your system must be able to export your data into a CSV (comma-separated value) file. You can then import the CSV file into JIRA using JIRA's CSV importer:

There is also a workaround for importing comments.

3. Third-party scripts

A number of third-party scripts are available on the Internet that support the importing of data into JIRA. These may be a better option for importing data than using the CSV importer.
Third-party scripts are currently available for the following import processes:

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Please note, third-party scripts are not supported by Atlassian.
The Atlassian forums may provide helpful information on the third-party scripts that you wish to use.

4. Jelly script

Another approach is to write a Jelly script that will import your data. JIRA ships with some Jelly tags that make operations like creating issues in JIRA easy.

5. RPC services

JIRA ships with an RPC plugin which enables limited remote access to JIRA. It is available through SOAP and XML-RPC interfaces. We recommend using the SOAP interface when possible as it is more complete and will be our primary focus in the future. The JIRA RPC Services​ page provides a starting point for all your remote procedure call needs.

The full source of the plugin is available and you are free to modify and the extend the source. We'd also be happy to accept code contributions to the project, as Simon Mittag has done in the past. Check out the RPC Endpoint Plugin Module​ for more information.

6. Your own method

It is possible to use whatever tools you feel comfortable with, to import the data directly into JIRA's database. JIRA's database schema is described in XML format in the WEB-INF/classes/entitydefs/entitymodel.xml file under the JIRA web application. When using this approach please take care to maintain database integrity.

Other references