Quick searching

Sometimes, you want to search in JIRA just like you search with Google. No messing around with specifying search criteria for each individual field or long JQL statements. You just want to enter a word or a phrase and get search results. You may even know the issue key that you are looking for. This is when quick search can help.

The quick search box is located at the top right of your screen. To use it, just starting typing what you are looking for. That's it!

The table below describes how the quick search provides you with search results, depending on what you do:

Action What happens?
Type an issue key
(e.g. JRA-1000)
A dropdown will display the matching issue.
Press enter or click the issue in the dropdown, and you'll be taken straight to the issue.
Type something but don't press Enter A dropdown will display the matching issues, projects, and filters.
See the Using the quick search dropdown section below for details.
Type something and press Enter You will be shown the matching search results in the global issue navigator.
See Running a quick search section below for details.

Using the quick search dropdown

 

The quick search dropdown suggests search results as you type. 

  Show me...

When you first click in the search box, it will display the issues and projects that you have recently viewed. As you type, it finds search results based on the following criteria (in order):

  You type... Quick search dropdown shows...
1 An issue key
  • Up to four issues with:
    An issue key (or part of an issue key) that matches.
    For example, "JRA-11" finds issues with the key JRA-11, JRA-110, JRA-111, etc. 
  • One project where:
    An issue in the project matches the issue key.
    For example, "JRA-11" will find issues in the "JRA" project. The "JRA" project will be shown in the results.
2 An issue key + text
  • Up to four issues with:
    An issue key (or part of an issue key) that matches AND
    A summary or description that contains the text.
    If fewer than 4 issues match the two criteria above, then issues with a summary or description that contains the issue key are also shown.
  • One project where:
    An issue in the project matches the issue key.
    For example, "JRA-11" will find issues in the "JRA" project. The "JRA" project will be shown in the results.
3 Text
  • Up to four issues with:
    A summary or description that contains the text.
  • Up to three projects with:
    A project key or project name that contains the text.
  • Up to three filters with:
    A filter name or filter description that contains the text.

Running a quick search

If the quick search dropdown doesn't return the results you want, run a quick search by pressing Enter on your keyboard after you enter your search criteria. You will be directed to the global issue navigator with the matching search results.

Using smart querying and text searching in the quick search

Smart querying and text searching are two types of logic that the quick search uses to find search results. If you understand how they work, you can run quick searches that find the desired search results more efficiently. 

  • Smart querying looks for certain keywords and variables in the criteria and finds results accordingly. For example, to find all the open bugs in the 'TEST' project, you can type 'test open bugs'. Learn more below: smart querying reference.
  • Text searching can be used to search against the Summary, Description, EnvironmentComments fields and text-based custom fields. This allows you to use tools like wildcards, fuzzy searches, boolean operators, and more, to find matching results. For example, you could enter "win*" to find all issues with "win" as a word (or part of a word) in the above fields. Learn more: Search syntax for text fields.

You can also combine smart querying and text searching. For example, entering "test open bugs win*" would find all the open bugs in the 'TEST' project with "win" as a word (or part of a word) in the text fields described above.

Smart querying reference

The following table lists the smart querying search terms:

Search Term

Description

Examples

my

Find issues assigned to me.

my open bugs

r:

Find issues reported by you, another user or with no reporter, using the prefix r: followed by a specific reporter term, such as me, a username or none.

Note that there can be no spaces between "r:" and the specific reporter term.

r:me — finds issues reported by you.
r:samuel — finds issues reported by the user whose username is "samuel".
r:none — finds issues with no reporter.

<project name>
or
<project key>

Find issues in a particular project.

test project
TST
tst

overdue

Find issues that were due before today.

overdue

created:
updated:
due:

Find issues with a particular Created, Updated, or Due Date using the prefixes created:, updated:, or due:, respectively. For the date range, you can use today, tomorrow, yesterday, a single date range (e.g. '-1w'), or two date ranges (e.g. '-1w,1w'). Note that date ranges cannot have spaces in them. Valid date/time abbreviations are: 'w' (week), 'd' (day), 'h' (hour), 'm' (minute).

created:today
created:yesterday
updated:-1w — finds issues updated in the last week.
due:1w — finds issues due in the next week.
due:-1d,1w — finds issues due from yesterday to next week.
created:-1w,-30m — finds issues created from one week ago, to 30 minutes ago.
created:-1d updated:-4h — finds issues created in the last day, updated in the last 4 hours.

<priority>

Find issues with a particular Priority.

blocker
major
trivial

<issue type>

Find issues with a particular Issue Type. Note that you can also use plurals.

bug
task
bugs
tasks

<resolution> Find issues with a particular Resolution.

fixed
duplicate
cannot reproduce

c:

Find issues with a particular Component(s). You can search across multiple components.

Note that there can be no spaces between "c:" and the component name.

c:security — finds issues with a component whose name contains the word "security".

v:

Find issues with a particular Affects Version(s). To find all issues belonging to a 'major' version, use the wildcard symbol '*'.

Note that there can be no spaces between "v:" and the version name.

v:3.0 — finds issues that match the following versions (for example):

  • 3.0
  • 3.0 eap
  • 3.0 beta

    ...but will not match against the following versions (for example):
  • 3.0.1
  • 3.0.0.4

    That is, it will match against any version that contains the string you specify followed immediately by a space, but not against versions that do not contain a space immediately after the string you specify.

ff:

Find issues with a particular Fix For Version(s). Same usage as v: (above).

 

*

Wildcard symbol '*'. Can be used with v: and ff:.

v:3.2* — finds any issue whose version number is (for example):

  • 3.2
  • 3.2-beta
  • 3.2.1
  • 3.2.x

Next steps

Read the following related topics:

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