Using JQL queries specific to SLAs

Jira Service Desk includes specific JQL syntax that can help you sort through the details of your requests and issues, and make sure you're hitting your SLA goals. Learn more about JQL syntax.

If your SLA goals use overlapping JQL filters, or depend on each other, then your JQL queries and SLAs may return unexpected results. Read more about setting SLA goals.


On this page

Find issues breaching your SLA goals

There are two functions you can use to search for issues that are in a certain state of SLA goal-ness:

  • breached() filters out issues whose last SLA cycle has failed to meet its target goal
  • everBreached() filters out issues that have failed to meet their target goal

For example, if you wanted to find all the issues in your project that have successfully completed your first-response goals, use the following query:

"Time to first response" != everBreached()

Find issues that have paused, completed and are still running an SLA clock

There are three functions you can use to search for issues that are in a certain state of completion:

  • paused() filters issues whose current SLA cycle is paused due to a condition. For example, you may pause an issue's SLA clock when the issue's status is set to "waiting for customer".
  • completed() filters issues whose SLA cycle is complete, meaning they've reached one of their stop events
  • running() filters issues whose current SLA clock is running, meaning they haven't yet reached one of their stop events
  • withincalendarhours() filters issues whose SLA clock is running or not running according to the SLA calendar, not conditions.

The paused and running functions do not return issues whose SLA cycles haven't started yet.

For example, if you want to find all the issues that are paused while completing a time to resolution SLA cycle, use the following query:

"Time to resolution" = paused()

Find issues based on their SLA clock

There are two functions you can use to search for issues that have a certain amount of time on their SLA cycle's clock:

  • elapsed() filters issues whose SLA cycle's clock meets a specified time condition since the ongoing SLA cycle's start event
  • remaining() filters issues whose SLA cycle's clock meets a specified time condition before the issue will breach an SLA goal

For example, if you want to find requests that have been waiting for a first response for less than 10 min, use the following query:

"Time to first response" < elapsed("10m")

Or, if you want to find issues that will breach their resolution target within the next two hours, use this query:

"Time to resolution" < remaining ("2h")
Last modified on Jun 21, 2018

Was this helpful?

Yes
No
Provide feedback about this article
Powered by Confluence and Scroll Viewport.