Documentation for JIRA 6.3. Not using this? See below:
(JIRA 6.2.x documentation | JIRA Cloud documentation | earlier versions of JIRA)

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JIRA is a 'web application', meaning it runs centrally on a server, and users interact with it through web browsers from any computer.

(info) If you are considering running JIRA on VMware, please read Virtualizing JIRA (JIRA on VMware).

No hardware? No problem! Try using JIRA Cloud.

  • No installation required, get started in 5 minutes
  • Option to migrate to your own server later
  • Choose from a set of supported add-ons to install

JIRA Client/Server Software Requirements

Please read the Supported Platforms page for JIRA, which lists the required server and client software supported by JIRA 6.3, including:

  • Browsers (client-side)
  • Java platforms (JDK/JRE) (server-side)
  • Operating systems (server-side)
  • Application servers (if you are installing the JIRA WAR distribution) (server-side)
  • Databases (server-side)

Please also read the information below regarding server and client software requirements for JIRA.

1. Browser

If you have disabled JavaScript in your browser or are using a script blocking tool like NoScript, you must enable your browser to execute JavaScript from JIRA to access JIRA's full functionality.

2. Java

JIRA requires a Java Developers Kit (JDK) or Java Runtime Environment (JRE) platform to be installed on your server's operating system.

If you intend to use the Windows Installer or Linux Installer to install JIRA, there is no need to install and configure a separate JDK/JRE since these executable files will install and configure their own JRE to run JIRA.

If, however, you intend to install JIRA from an archive or you plan to install the JIRA WAR distribution, then you will first need to install a supported Java platform. (Refer to Supported Platforms for supported Java Platforms). For instructions on how to install a supported Java platform for JIRA, please refer to Installing Java.

(info) Please Note:

  • Currently, Oracle JDK/JRE (formerly Sun JDK/JRE) is available for Windows (32-bit + 64-bit), Linux (32-bit + 64-bit) and Solaris Platforms (32-bit + 64-bit).
    Mac OS X systems are packaged with a JDK optimised for their hardware and operating systems. However, these JDKs are not supported by JIRA.
  • A JIRA installation running on a 64-bit Java platform may require additional memory (to run at a similar level of performance) to a JIRA installation running on a 32-bit Java platform.
    This is because a 64-bit Java platform's object references are twice the size as those for a 32-bit Java platform.

3. Application Server

JIRA is a web application that requires an application server. However, this requirement differs based on the type of JIRA distribution you intend to install:

  • 'Recommended' JIRA distributions (installed using 'Windows Installer', 'Linux Installer' or from an 'Archive File') are pre-configured with Apache Tomcat, which is a stable, lightweight and fast-performing application server. (There is no need to install a separate application server if you intend to install one of these recommended JIRA distributions.)
  • The JIRA WAR distribution can be installed into an application server (supported by Atlassian), provided this application server is compatible with your operating system and Java platform. You must manually configure your JIRA WAR installation to operate with an existing application server installation.

4. Database

JIRA requires a relational database to store its issue data. JIRA supports most popular relational database servers, so we suggest using the one that you are most comfortable with administering. JIRA ships pre-configured with the HSQLDB database, which is suitable for evaluation purposes only, since HSQLDB is prone to database corruption.

Hence, if you intend to use JIRA in a production environment, we strongly recommend that you connect JIRA to an enterprise database (supported by Atlassian).

5. Notes

  • Virus checking software are a common cause of performance problems. In particular, Symantec must be uninstalled from the server that you want to install JIRA on, as it is known to dramatically reduces JIRA performance (even stopping the services does not prevent it from slowing JIRA down).
    For more information, see this knowledge base article: Crashes and Performance Issues Troubleshooting

JIRA Server Hardware Recommendations

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JIRA typically will not perform well in a tightly constrained, shared environment - examples include an AWS micro.t1 instance. Please be careful to ensure that your choice of hosting platform is capable of supplying sustained processing and memory capacity for the server.

JIRA Server Hardware Recommendation for Evaluation

During evaluation, JIRA will run well on any reasonably fast workstation computer (eg. something purchased within the last two years). Memory requirements depend on how many projects and issues you will store, but 300MB – 1GB (of Java heap size) is enough for most evaluation purposes.

(tick) There are two ways to evaluate JIRA:

  1. Start immediately with JIRA Cloud and then migrate to a local production server later, or simply continue to use JIRA Cloud.
  2. Install JIRA Server on a local computer and then migrate this to a production server later.

JIRA Server Hardware Recommendation for Production

The hardware required to run JIRA in production depends on a number of different JIRA configurations (eg. projects, issues, custom fields, permissions, etc) as well as the maximum number of concurrent requests that the system will experience during peak hours. Here are some general guide lines:

  • For a small number of projects (10-20) with 1,000 to 5,000 issues in total and about 100-200 users, a recent server (multicore CPU) with 2 GB of available RAM and a reasonably fast hard drive (7200rpm or faster) should cater for your needs.
  • For a greater number of issues adding more memory will help. We have reports that having 2GB of RAM to JIRA is sufficient for instances with around 200,000 issues. If in doubt, allocate more memory than you think you need.
  • If your system will experience a large number of concurrent requests, running JIRA on a multicore CPU machine will increase the concurrency of processing the requests and therefore speed up the response time for your users.
  • For reference we have a server that has a 2 Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5520 @ 2.27GHz (16 logical cores) with 32GB of RAM. This server runs Apache, various monitoring systems, and two JIRA instances:
    • Our public JIRA site that has approximately: 145,000 issues, 255,000 comments, 120 custom fields, and 115 projects. 
    • Our support JIRA site that has approximately: 285,000 issues, 2,500,000 comments, 75 custom fields, and 22 projects.

Please note that performance heavily depends on your dimensions and your usage pattern, much more than what is simply covered here. Therefore we have written a guide on the different methods you can use to scale JIRA in your environment

A quick note that your JIRA database's size is predominantly dominated by these three large tables: change items, comments and issues stored in your JIRA instance. Also, the type of custom fields and the values they hold may also increase the size of your JIRA database, eg. a free text custom field that is on every issue with grow the database size if the value of that field is large.

(warning) Please Note: JIRA requires access to a local disk for certain functionality. If JIRA does not have read and write access to a local disk, searching and saving/accessing attachments will not work.

(info) While some of our customers run JIRA on SPARC-based hardware, Atlassian only officially supports JIRA running on x86 hardware and 64-bit derivatives of x86 hardware.

Next Steps

Install JIRA.

 

27 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    Atlassian, are you planning on addressing the scalability of Jira?  As an administrator of a Jira instance with around 100k issues, I am very concerned about the possibility of splitting a Jira instance in the future.  I don't think it is a good solution and would hope that work is being done to address this issue. 

    1. Thought I was logged in - the previous comment was from me.

    2. Anonymous

      Agree with this. Need something done in this regard.

  2. Anonymous

    I see you do not support Jira on Mac.  We run an all-mac shop.  Any plans of supporting Jira on macs in the future? 

      1. We've removed that video.

        Mac OS X is not a supported operating system for the JIRA server because Oracle JDK and JRE (formerly Sun JDK and JRE), which are the only supported Java platforms for JIRA, are not available for this operating system. Mac OS X is packaged with a JDK optimised for its hardware. More details here:

        http://confluence.atlassian.com/display/JIRA/Installing+JIRA+Standalone+on+Mac+OS+X

        1. Now that Oracle does have a version of the JDK available for OS X, will Atlassian support deployments on OS X?

          1. It's a funny thing. We all know that JIRA works on OSX because that's what it is mostly developed on. But since almost no-one uses OSX servers for their company there is not much to be gained (in my opinion) spending the testing time that would be needed for it. I run JIRA every day on OSX with no platform-related issues.

          2. Hi Werner,

            I have checked with our product managers and can confirm that Atlassian does not plan on supporting deployments on OS X. As Matt as suggested in his comment above, JIRA may run on an OS X server, however we do not test against it and do not fix bugs related to it.

            Kind Regards,
            Andrew

  3. Anonymous

    What support and implications are there when running it in a VM environment?

      1. Very interesting to observe that the access to this page was restricted!?

        1. That sounds like a bug because it didn't used to be.

        2. Hi Sorin,

          The page that Christina referred to has been deprecated in favour of this one: Virtualizing JIRA (JIRA on VMware). I had a deprecation notice on the old page for a little while and recently restricted it. It will be deleted soon as it is out of date.

          Apologies for the confusion.

          Kind Regards,
          Andrew

  4. Can we run JIRA on multiple application servers?  The previous SME set us up with a warm standby.  I am hoping he just didn't investigate this, as it seems really surprising that a mission-critical, database-backed web application couldn't be scaled properly.

     

    Thanks,

    -danny

  5. How well does JIRA/JAVA take advantage of multi-core processors?  If I have a choice of a 4-core 3.2 GHz machine, or a 6-core 3.0 GHz machine, what will make our large JIRA instance run faster?  The raw CPU speed, or the greater number of cores?

  6. JIRA is generally not cpu-bound so it may not make much of a difference either way. You could look at getting the cheapest option out of those and then spend the difference on extra RAM and/or SSDs.

    Although there is a benefit to getting lots of cores and then using NUMA settings for GC. Also your DB might benefit, assuming it's running on the same box.

  7. From Re: ScreenshotApplet throws ClassNotFoundException (com.atlassian.jira.screenshot.applet.ScreenshotApplet.class) it appears that the version of Java on the client side has to be before Java 7 for the screenshot application to work.

  8. Anonymous

    It would be nice to mention that JIRA requires a mail server (either local or remote) to process the email notifications properly. Comments from the Using Gmail as a JIRA Mail Server article are quite helpful as an entry point to this topic.

  9. '300MB – 1GB' for evaluation is... outdated at the least!  I could not get JIRA running with 1GB of memory, and it doesn't even pass along the Java memory error on launch.

    Looks like I'm not the only one:

    "...fresh install of JIRA 5.5.1 takes between 2.1 and 2.3 GB of RAM, with 0 issues and standard plugin set."

    I'm not sure what the point is of a 32-bit installation, if JIRA needs more than 1.2 GB of memory!

    Hope this saves someone else the hour I have lost trying out JIRA.

    1. I reckon to use a machine with 4GB to run JIRA these days. 2GB almost works if nothing else is running.

    2. As of July 2013 JIRA works with Ubuntu Server with 1 Gb. It is not light-speed sure, but it works.

  10. Anonymous

    We are planning to have 500 projects and 2 Lakh issues in total. What would be the database size needed for this in production?

  11. Anonymous

    Can you run install JIRA and Crucible on the same server?

  12. Does JIRA support 64-bit Oracle 11g database?

  13. Anonymous

    Hopefully JIRA supports ARM-processors one day....